Yahoo News - Top Stories
last updated: Sat, 04 Jul 2015 04:00:13 -0400

What happens if Greeks vote 'Yes', what happens if it's a 'No'
Sunday's referendum in Greece will set a new course for the country after a tumultuous half year of negotiating between Athens and its international creditors. A "Yes" vote could mean a new government, a news series of negotiations and Greece's continued membership of the euro zone. A "No" vote could mean the euro zone loses a member - a fate that could rock the stability of the currency.

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15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World

Everyone has a bad day at work now and then. But if you have one of these 15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World, even one bad day can get you or someone else killed. From EMT to Coal Miner to Ice Road Trucker, these are the jobs that will keep you up at nights!


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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Sat, 04 Jul 2015 00:03:13 -0400

America welcomes July 4 with hot dogs, cool music, cold beer

A young girl waves a flag during rehearsal for the annual Boston Pops orchestra Fourth of July concert at the Hatch Shell in Boston, Friday, July 3, 2015. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)As the nation gears up to celebrate America's birthday, here are some Fourth of July highlights from around the country:


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Digg Top Stories
last updated: Fri, 03 Jul 2015 19:56:40 +0000

Reddit's Community Calamity
Some recent firings have the Reddit community upset, but not nearly as upset as some of their current and former employees.

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Reuters: Top News
last updated: Fri, 03 Jul 2015 13:53:02 GMT

Greeks deeply divided heading into crucial vote
ATHENS (Reuters) - Tens of thousands of Greeks took to the streets on Friday in rival rallies that laid bare the deep divide heading into a referendum that may decide the country’s future in Europe’s single currency.

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BuzzFeed Index - Latest
last updated: Fri, 03 Jul 2015 22:01:04 -0400

How Well Do You Remember "The Raccoons" Opening?

Channel your inner Canadian child.

The creator of The Raccoons, a beloved retro Canadian cartoon, is reportedly plotting a comeback. But how well do you remember the show's opening?

The creator of The Raccoons, a beloved retro Canadian cartoon, is reportedly plotting a comeback. But how well do you remember the show's opening?

CBC / Via youtu.be

How did you do?

youtube.com

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Which Modern Disney Villain Are You?

“The outside world is a dangerous place, filled with horrible, selfish people.” - Mother Gothel

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We Know Who Your Celebrity Crush Is

♫ It’s a love story, baby…♫

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Which Fictional Fashion Magazine Would You Work At?

A million girls would kill for any one of these jobs.

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Am I Funny Or Mean?

“I’ll show all you crumbums!”

BuzzFeed Violet / Via youtu.be

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28 Photos That Perfectly Describe Every Quinceañera

You only turn 15 once.

When the quinceañera wore a beautiful dress that could probably be seen from space.

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When the decorations resembled that of a small royal wedding.

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When there were more balloons than there were people at the party.

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When the quinceañera's court rode in a huge stretch limo for the whole five minute commute to the venue...

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If Bea Miller's Tweets Were Motivational Posters

Clouds are mother nature’s filter.

Duc Le / Via unsplash.com

Kirk Morales / Via unsplash.com

Hannah Sellers / Via unsplash.com

Aaron Burden / Via unsplash.com


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6 Summer Ice Cubes That'll Up Your Drink Game

Lions and flowers and fruit, oh my!

BuzzFeed Video / Via youtu.be

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Donnie Wahlberg Fed Poutine To A Toronto Radio Producer And It Was Super Awkward

Hangin’ not so tough.

While there he met up with Dammitt Maurie from Kiss 92.5. Maurie wore a bike helmet with a camera attached to it, so the whole thing was strange from the start.

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"You're gettin' that really close to me," Wahlberg said as Maurie shoved the microphone in his face.

"You're gettin' that really close to me," Wahlberg said as Maurie shoved the microphone in his face.

kiss925.com

Maurie asked if women still throw their underwear at the stage during NKOTB concerts. "They're just as loud and boisterous but they don't throw stuff at us," Wahlberg said. "They're smarter with their money."

Maurie asked if women still throw their underwear at the stage during NKOTB concerts. "They're just as loud and boisterous but they don't throw stuff at us," Wahlberg said. "They're smarter with their money."

Then it gets down to the most imporotant part of the interview: poutine. Wahlburgers just added it to their menu.

"Have you tried it yet?" Wahlberg asks.

"No, I was hoping you'd feed it to me," Maurie said.

Okaaaaaaay.

kiss925.com


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4 Cocktails Every Whiskey-Lover Should Try This Summer

Because you’ve got to cool down somehow!

BuzzFeed Blue / Via youtu.be

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Inspiring Advice About Writing From Joyce Carol Oates

David J. Bertozzi / Andrew Richard / BuzzFeed

It's been 52 years since Joyce Carol Oates published her first book, a short story collection titled By the North Gate. Since then, Oates, now 77, has written over 40 novels and countless poems and short stories, and she has been honored with the National Book Award and even Pulitzer Prize nominations.

BuzzFeed recently had the chance to speak with Oates about the art of writing. Since the author has seen great literary success that most writers aspire to achieve, we asked her for advice. Here's what she had to say:

BuzzFeed: What do you wish you knew about writing when you first started?

Joyce Carol Oates: I wouldn't really want to change much about my early life as a writer. I think that I envy my younger self because I used to write a whole draft of a novel and then go back and rewrite it. Today, I do a lot of revising as I go along and that seems to be more painful and arduous. I think my younger self could actually help me now; I need some tips from my younger self. I’m working on a novel now and it seems like I’ve been working on it for years because it's been going so slowly. It used to be that I could at least write a chapter in a week and then I would rewrite it. Now I’m almost revising every paragraph, then I go back and do the whole page, then I’ll go back to the beginning of the chapter. It's a slow process, almost like putting a mosaic together or weaving things in and out, whereas before it felt more like galloping on a horse and then creating the manuscript. For some reason I’ve become more attuned to the individual sentence and reworking the sentences. I’m not sure why that happened.

Do you think that's because now you're a highly established author and people read your work more carefully?

JCO: No, it’s more about my personality changing. I’m not very conscious of anybody reading my work; I never think about that. Each work has its own integrity. If you’re writing a short story, the story’s probably going to be about 25 pages long with a certain density and lyricism. You can’t write it too fast, because that’s how long it takes. So, the important thing is the integrity of that work. Now, a shorter story, something like a delightful little thing by [Jean-Jacques] Barthélemy, is sort of like a flame; you light the match and it burns — it’s really quick. Something like that is usually three pages long, and you wouldn’t want to take three months to work on that because that’s not appropriate. But if you’re taking an ambitious subject — like a novel about two families going through a tough time for 10 years or 12 years or so — it takes a long time, sort of spiritually and emotionally, just to grasp that. I think that’s one of my problems: I’m trying to fully realize each paragraph but then not make it too long. There’s always breaks and editing, so I’m going forward then taking some steps back, but before I would just go forward and then go back to the beginning and do the whole thing over again. I recommend to my students that they do the whole thing quickly and then revise, that they not write the way I do. But everybody I know writes the way I do. It has something to do with the computer.

What tools do you use to write? Do you use a computer, notebook, typewriter, iPhone, etc.?

JCO: I do a lot of writing in longhand, lots of scenes and a lot of notes. The computer has changed everything, though. If James Joyce had used the computer to work on Finnegan’s Wake, he might still be working on it because there’s no end; you always do just a little more. It took him seven years to do Ulysses

, but then when he got the galleys he increased it by one-third with his notes in the margins. We can see the madness that technology allows to flourish.

So you use a combination of techniques?

JCO: The notes come first and since I travel a lot, I take notes by hand. At first the notes are just for me, but after a while I’ll put them together into an outline, and then I type them onto a computer. I can basically have a whole novel on the computer. If I’m working on a specific page, I still have the whole novel there so I can scroll through and see the end. I always have the end written. As I’m touching base with the ending every day, I’m wondering how I can eventually get there.

David J. Bertozzi / Andrew Richard / BuzzFeed

Do you write the end first?

JCO: Yes. I write the end, or the last sentence, first. Even if I don't physically write it down, I always at least know how the story ends.

Where is your favorite place to write?

JCO: I could almost write anywhere. I need to look out a window. I liked writing where I lived down in the West Village. That was very nice; we had a large apartment with three bedrooms, so we had a lot of windows everywhere. When I lived in Berkeley I also had a view of the San Francisco Bay.

What did you write with that view?

JCO: I was working on this never-ending novel. The title is The Book of American Martyrs. I guess you could say it’s somewhat timely, it’s about the abortion bans. One family is very pro-life and they’re evangelical Christians — I’m very sympathetic with them, I’m not being satirical. Then the other family is pro-choice, and there's also an abortion doctor. The story's about how they all interact with the assassination of that doctor who’s sort of a hero. The two families come together in this way but they’re still in this completely realized world. It's a challenge.

David J. Bertozzi / Andrew Richard / BuzzFeed

What’s the best piece of advice another writer gave to you?

JCO: Most writers just complain.

Do you ever talk about your different writing processes with other authors?

JCO: You know, it’s like two cats. If cats could talk, they would talk about food or something. When I talk to Margaret [Atwood], it's usually about endangered species, birds, and things like that. But I don’t usually talk about writing process with other writers. My friend Edmund White and I commiserate together because it’s hard to be a writer and nobody else wants to hear it.

How do you know when a story is truly finished?

JCO: Oh, you can tell. I work on something over a period of time, and it’s particularly evident when the work is done when I'm writing a poem. I’m doing some narrative poems, not often but I do them; you can read it over and over again and scroll through it on the computer. You can read it in three minutes and can tell if it’s a little long or if it needs more development. Overall, I think it’s about intuition. My students seem not to know when things need to be enhanced. Young writers need a little nudge. My students usually have a good beginning and good ending, but there’s nothing in the middle. They'll say, "Oh! I thought it was done." And I'll have to say, "Nope, it’s not done. You need more in the middle." It's hard to learn things like pacing and structure.

Do you ever struggle with writer’s block?

JCO: I struggle with something; I’m not sure if it’s writer’s block. Writer’s block doesn’t exist, except it’s a very expensive block in Park Slope where all these writers live and it’s really expensive. Instead, I’d call it frustration or slowness. I think I have a lot of interruptions in my life. That’s the best advice to give a writer or an artist: Be in some place where you’re not interrupted. That could even mean internal interruptions, too. Get to some physical and mental place where you’re not going to be interrupted.

Jack of Spades: A Tale of Suspense is on sale now.

Jack of Spades: A Tale of Suspense is on sale now.

Grove Press

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16 White Lies You Tell On Your C.V. In Order To Get Hired

Because telling lies gets you the job… right?

"I have very open availability, and am willing to work overtime to get the job done."

"I have very open availability, and am willing to work overtime to get the job done."

What you really mean:YOU BETTER BE PAYING ME IF I WORK OVER THE 37.5 HOUR QUOTA.

VH1

"I have fantastic customer service and people skills."

"I have fantastic customer service and people skills."

What you really mean: I hate people. People are the worst. But I will fake a smile if I'm getting paid for it.

United Artists

"I'm an honest and trust-worthy person."

"I'm an honest and trust-worthy person."

What you really mean: This very resume, and all the information in it, is a at least *slightly* exaggerated. Because I need some MONEY.

FX

"I'm an extremely hardworking individual."

"I'm an extremely hardworking individual."

What you really mean: TBH work isn't like, my ideal place to be. But unfortunately, I need money to live, so here I am.

20th Century Fox


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Just A Reminder That A Mulder And Scully Intersection Exists In Canada

Mulder X Scully

Google Maps

This looks like every other suburb, or is it? Let's investigate a little closer.

This looks like every other suburb, or is it? Let's investigate a little closer.

20th Century Fox / Via foxanddana.tumblr.com


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The 21 Most Aggressively American Things To Ever Happen On The Internet

Happy birthday to the greatest country in the universe!

When moon man Buzz Aldrin uploaded this photo:

This totally hypothetical situation:


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How Well Do You Remember "How To Lose A Guy In 10 Days"?

True or false: All is fair in love and war.

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4 DIY Outfits For The 4th Of July

Crafting independence one marker at a time.

BuzzFeed Video / Via youtu.be

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The Biggest Winners And Losers In Movies In 2015, So Far

From Chris Pratt and Elizabeth Banks to Tomorrowland and Will Smith, here are the actors, filmmakers, and studios with reason to celebrate for the first half of the year — and others who may wish it was over already.

Pratt/Universal; Clooney/Disney; Smith/Warner Bros.; Piven/Warner Bros.; Johnson/Universal; Walker and Diesel/Universal; "Inside Out"/Disney-Pixar; "Pitch Perfect 2"/Universal; Theron/Warner Bros.

In 2014, movie ticket sales dropped to a 25-year low, but in the first half of 2015, Hollywood has rebounded with a vengeance.

The year began with American Sniper and Fifty Shades of Grey setting all-time domestic box office records for January and February respectively. By May, two more movies — Furious 7 and Avengers: Age of Ultron — became the fourth- and fifth-highest-grossing films ever in the world. And in June, Jurassic World broke the all-time domestic opening weekend record, cracked the global box office all-time top 10, and became one of just five films ever to make over $500 million domestically.

With such a deep bench of massive hits, it is no surprise that overall, domestic box office grosses are up a robust 6.3% from the first half of 2014. Total domestic ticket sales are at their highest since 2009, and second highest since 2004. With several highly anticipated films still to come this year — including Minions, Spectre, The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2, and Star Wars: The Force Awakens — 2015 has the potential to be Hollywood's biggest year in a decade.

Adam B. Vary/BuzzFeed

But even with so much good news thus far in 2015, the movie industry still endured some slips, flops, and worrisome chronic problems endemic to feature filmmaking in the 2010s. Here is a midyear look at who has good reason to be celebrating this year in movies, and who has good reason to wish it was already over.


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25 Reasons Wales Is Just The Worst During Summer

It’s just so bad.

When you think of summer, Wales is probably the last place that springs to mind.

When you think of summer, Wales is probably the last place that springs to mind.

Buan, Gwynedd.

Flickr: _belial / Creative Commons

And with good reason.

And with good reason.

Tenby, Pembrokeshire.

Flickr: angelganev / Creative Commons

I mean look at the place.

I mean look at the place.

Pen y Fan, Powys.

Flickr: duncan / Creative Commons

With the permanent grey sky...

With the permanent grey sky...

Moel Famau, Denbighshire.

Flickr: davei / Creative Commons


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How Much Sugar Is In Your Alcoholic Drinks

Everyone only ever has one drink, right?

BuzzFeed Blue / Via youtu.be

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17 Struggles Anyone Whose Best Friend Lives In Another Country Will Understand

“What time is it there? Oh… you’re still asleep.”

If you and your best friend live in totally different countries...

If you and your best friend live in totally different countries...

Crystal Ro for BuzzFeed

...you're all too familiar with the hardships of not having them around.

...you're all too familiar with the hardships of not having them around.

Fox / Via kencord.tumblr.com

You have mild panic attacks when you get a text from them in the middle of the night.

You have mild panic attacks when you get a text from them in the middle of the night.

Even on vibrate.

NBC / Via sandandglass.tumblr.com

And you ALWAYS feel responsible for taking their call no matter what state you're in.

And you ALWAYS feel responsible for taking their call no matter what state you're in.

Awake or other.

HBO / Via justliveonce.tumblr.com


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